The Web Site Devoted Exclusively to the Ancient Art of Catching Aerobies with Sticks

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An Aerobie and Broomsticks

Aerobies are simply (as in "simply amazing") plastic rings with a heavy core aerodynamically designed to fly great distances. Designed and patented by a company called Superflight, Inc. They sell for, maybe, $10.

Aerosticks, the subject of this web page, is what I call the game of catching Aerobies with broomstick or rake handles. You might call the game, or the sticks, "Aerosticks."

The author at play.

I first encountered an Aerobie at dusk in Massachusetts in the summer of 1983. Since then, for around 20 grueling years of single minded devotion, I have focussed my athletic life (admittedly, a rather small part of my life) on developing my ability to project this ringed instrument of flight through the air and to receive it with style.             

In this process I have created Aerosticks, my personal approach to Aerobie athletics and art.         

I invented the game of Aerosticks. (Other people may have invented it too, but so far they haven't described it in a web page.)

An Aerobie is what a Frisbee dreams it might become some day.

To throw and catch an Aerobie well is to experience joy, freedom, power and self knowledge (...is this guy serious?)


This is what Aerobies look like (above). Only the full size 13" models (Aerobie Pro) work well for Aerosticks. Don't bother with the smaller ones for Aerosticks... the small one's are too hard to spear, and don't have the aerodynamic grace of the large ones.


With this web site, I release my invention, the noble game of Aerosticks, to the world.

If you try it, (or already have tried it... someone must have thought of this besides me), let me know about your experiences.

Already, Aerosticks has been deluged with an actual testimonial from a satisfied Aerosticks player. To read how, click here.

Happy catching, happy being caught.

Miles Hochstein        

 



Copyright 2000-2001, Miles Hochstein.
Aerobie and related names are the copyright of Alan Adler or Superflight or someone, but, obviously, not me. Lots of sites have a little notice like this when they use someone's copyrighted name. There is probably a reason for it.